Engage, enlighten, explore - at your library Library Ask Us
http://www.usask.ca/

University Library

 
 
How to Find Items Listed in a Bibliography
Introduction

A quick way to find additional resources for a term paper is to use bibliographies from textbooks, readings packages etc. Bibliographies (or references or works cited lists) are found at the end of most scholarly publications and can lead you to other relevant resources for your research. Check the examples below for tips on locating print and electronic sources listed in bibliographies.

 
Books
Typical book citation:

Elkins, J. (2007). Is art history global? New York: Routledge.

It’s probably a book if...the citation contains author, title, and publication details, but no volume or issue number, no URL etc. 

Find it by...completing a title search in the Library Catalogue.

If it’s not in the Catalogue...you can request it through Interlibrary Loan.

 
Book Chapters

Typical chapter citation:

Thompson, R. A. (2009). Relationships, stress, and memory. In J. A. Quas & R. Fivush (Eds.), Emotion and memory in development: Biological, cognitive, and social considerations (pp. 355-373). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

It’s probably a chapter from a book if...the citation contains two titles, and the word In appears after the first title.

Find it by...completing a search for the title of the book (not the chapter title) in the  Library Catalogue.

If it’s not in the Catalogue...you can request it through Interlibrary Loan.

 
Journal Articles in Print
Typical print journal article citation:

Williamson, T. (1997). Knowledge as evidence. Mind, 106, 717-741.

It’s probably a print journal article if...the citation contains author, two titles, as well as volume, issue (not always present), and page numbers.

Find it by...completing a search for the title of the journal (not the title of the article) in the Library Catalogue.

If it’s not in the Catalogue...You can request it through Interlibrary Loan.

 
Journal Articles from Electronic Journals
Typical citations for articles from electronic journals:

Journal article with DOI assigned

Bergin, C., & Bergin, D. (2009). Attachment in the Classroom. Educational Psychology Review, 21(2), 141-170. doi: 10.1007/s10648-009-9104-0.

Journal article with a permanent link

Phillion, J. (2003). Obstacles to accessing the teaching profession for immigrant women. Multicultural Education, 11(1), 41-45. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3935/is_200310/ai_n9322323.

It’s probably an article from an e-journal if...

  • In addition to author, journal title, and article title etc., the citation also contains a DOI (Digital Object Identifier), a long alphanumeric sequence which links directly to a particular article.
  • In addition to author, journal title, and article title etc., the citation also contains a URL linking directly to the article.

Find it by...

  • If you are on campus, enter (or copy and paste) the DOI or permanent link into  your web browser.
  • If you are off campus, search for the title of the journal (not the title of the article) in the Library Catalogue.