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Freedom to Read at the Library

Throughout our country's history, Canadians have tried to ban books and magazines that they believe are offensive or inappropriate.

Throughout our country's history, Canadians have tried to ban books and magazines that they believe are offensive or inappropriate. These challenges to our intellectual freedom have sometimes been successful and sometimes not.

February 21st to 27th 2016 is Freedom to Read Week in Canada. "Freedom to Read Week is an annual event that encourages Canadians to think about and reaffirm their commitment to intellectual freedom, which is guaranteed to them under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms." 

Visit the 1st floor of the Murray Library (by the Research Help Desk) to see our display showcasing books from our collection that have been banned or challenged in Canada. There are a multitude of reasons why these books have been challenged, such as claims of nudity and sexual content, political content, racist or insensitive language, feminist ideas, obscene language, depictions of graphic violence, or biased views. Even if these claims may be valid, there are also a multitude of reasons why these books should remain available to the public. Exposing people to a wide spectrum of opinions and values, and providing them with the tools to think critically about divisive issues, allows them to make informed decisions about their own systems of beliefs. 

We will also be sharing articles and examples of challenged books every day during Freedom to Read Week on the Murray Library Facebook page.

Content for this news post has been taken from the Freedom to Read website. Visit the site for more information, including in-depth articles, resources, and to view their very long list of works that have been challenged in Canadian libraries.

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