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"Blood" by Centennial Collegiate art student Peyton Cote, part of the "impact" theme for this year's SSAIL exhibit.

The impact of SSAIL

The Murray Library is once again displaying some new artwork from local high school art students.

The art exhibit is part of the Secondary School Art in the Library (SSAIL) initiative, a partnership between the Department of Art and Art History, Student Recruitment, and the University Library, which began in September 2015. SSAIL introduces students from a local high school to art and art history offerings at USask and provides them with the opportunity to showcase their finished pieces at the library.

Each fall, Student Recruitment and the Department of Art and Art History connect with a local high school art teacher who has expressed interest in the project. Workshops are offered to the high school art class to help the students develop their skills and to promote USask’s visual arts programs. The students create a piece of art during the fall semester that is of importance or meaning to them and provide a reflection to accompany their piece.

This year’s artwork comes from art students at Centennial Collegiate in Saskatoon focusing on the theme of “Impact”.

“SSAIL encourages students to express themselves and demonstrates the power of art,” said Alison Pickrell, assistant vice-provost, strategic enrolment management. “It is an opportunity for USask to engage with secondary students and showcase the opportunities we offer to study the visual arts and the history of art.  Students also learn about the important learning services and supports offered by the University Library.”

“This art from these talented high school students makes our library space more inviting and vibrant,” said Christine Drever, operations manager of the Murray Library.  “It is gratifying to see the pride these students have as their creativity is featured among the many artworks we display at the library.”

The students were honoured at a reception in the Murray Library where their framed works were unveiled on the first floor. The exhibit will be on display until December.

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