THE PRINCE ALBERT TIMES AND SASKATCHEWAN REVIEW
PUBLISHED BY SPINK & MAVEETY

T. A. SPINK J. D. MAVEETY AT THEIR OFFICE. PRINCE ALBERT, N.W.T.

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A FEW PLAIN WORDS.

If Horace in his day saw cause to bitterly complain of men seized with the insanibile caeoethes scribendi, how much more are we to be pitied in our generation under the awful infliction of men suffering from the yet more incurable itch of speaking -- we had almost permitted ourselves to use the expressive but vulgar term “jawing.” Emotions of pity, disgust and amusement in turn displace each other, as when sometimes happens, something with all the organs, and more or less the outward form of a human being, gets up repeatedly at public meetings and substituting sound for sense, belches forth mighty nothings begotten of the very emptiness of his starved inside. Of course to stand up in public with a full knowledge of one’s importance with an air as determined as a slightly insignificant personal appearance admits of, pipe out “we must have so and so,” “we’ll force the Government to do this and that,” is from one point of view irresistibly amusing, and we would be loath by squashing such and object to deprive the public of so rare a treat as such a spectacle affords, especially when the exhibition costs nothing but the self respect of the exhibitor. Our desire is to speak a few plain words to men, who while very different from such as we have sufficiently indicated above, are with the best intentions, by keeping up an unsettled feeling in the Territories, damaging the value of property generally. Far be it from us to say a word against the union of all parties, to use every constitutional means to obtain redress of grievances, which undoubtedly exist, and to assert our rights, but in order to do this we must talk and act like sensible men. Now to preach rebellion is on the face of it folly of the worst sort. Annexation to the States, although repugnant to the feelings of the vast majority of the people, is under certain conditions practicable. To join Manitoba and British Columbia (were they prepared for such a course) in an appeal to the Crown for disintegration from the Dominion, or even later on to make this application on our own account, is feasible. But to talk of a rebellion now is simply bosh. Supposing such an insane attempt to be made, the Government has only to close the land offices, to stop the issue of our patents, to remove the police and stop money and other supplies to the Indians, to discontinue our mail service, and remove the general machinery of civilized governments, in order to bring us on our knees by the mere vis inertiae. Meanwhile every idle threat of a disturbance reaching quarters where its real value is far from understood keeps out settlers and drives away capital, and we suspect that all this comes of misapprehension. We ground this statement on the belief that were our reasonable requirements properly put before the Government, it is entirely to their interest to attend to them. If the mountain won’t go to Mahomet, Mahomet must go to the mountain -


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