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The Clandestine Camera: Canada’s Great War Through the Photos of Sgt. William Wightman

Two years ago, while helping his mother organize some of her keepsakes, Keith Carlson came across something he had never seen before, and that his mother did not remember having.

A Public Lecture. No admission fee:

7:00pm, March 22, 2016
Convocation Hall, University of Saskatchewan
 
By Keith Thor Carlson, Professor of History
 
Two years ago, while helping his mother organize some of her keepsakes, Keith Carlson came across something he had never seen before, and that his mother did not remember having. Tucked in a shoebox was a small leather wallet containing over 30 photographs taken by Keith’s grandfather, Sgt. William Vint Wightman while serving as a member of the 29th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces on the western front. It was illegal for service men to have cameras and take pictures on the front lines. That makes these images different from the official photographs with which we are familiar. They offer candid, and clandestine, glimpses into a soldier’s life; what he felt was important to document.  But who were these photos for, and what can we learn from them today?
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